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Exxon Mobil subsidiaries to pay nearly $5M for oil spill

Exxon Mobil subsidiaries to pay nearly $5M for oil spill

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) - The Justice Department says two subsidiaries of Exxon Mobil have agreed to pay almost $5 million in government penalties from a 2013 oil spill in a central Arkansas community.

As part of a consent decree set to be filed in a Little Rock federal court Wednesday, the companies would pay about $3.2 million in federal civil penalties in addition to addressing pipeline safety issues and oil-response capacity. They would pay $1 million in state civil penalties, $600,000 for a project to improve water quality at Lake Conway and $280,000 for the state's legal costs.

Assistant Attorney General John Cruden notes that Exxon Mobil doesn't admit liability in agreeing to the measures.

UCA professor promotes new book with 12-foot-long alligator gar

UCA professor promotes new book with 12-foot-long alligator gar

CONWAY, Ark. (UCA) - Fish-writer and University of Central Arkansas writing professor Mark Spitzer is driving around Arkansas with a 12-foot-long alligator gar on top of his car to promote his new book, Return of the Gar, just out from the University of North Texas Press.

The last stop on his statewide tour will be at Hastings Books and Music in Conway on Saturday, May 9, from 1-3 p.m. Return of the Gar continues the conservationist crusade Spitzer began 13 years ago to de-stigmatize this monstrous-looking prehistoric fish. Alligator gar, the largest member of the gar family, can grow 11 feet long and weigh more than 300 pounds ― and they’re right here in Arkansas.

Arkansas Tobacco Free Kids Day

Arkansas Tobacco Free Kids Day

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (Ark. Youth Leadership Initiative) - Kids from across Arkansas will convene in Little Rock to join in the fight against tobacco and other nicotine use on Wednesday, March 18th with a Silent March and Mock Funeral along Capitol Avenue, followed by a press conference on the steps of the State Capitol.

Sponsored by the Arkansas Youth Leadership Initiative and other public health partners, Arkansas Tobacco Free Kids Day is an annual celebration of youth leadership and activism in the fight against tobacco use. Kids are sending two powerful messages on this day: They want the tobacco companies to stop targeting them with marketing for cigarettes, e-cigarettes, and other tobacco products and they want elected leaders to do more to protect them from tobacco.

IPDRA working to finish rebuilding what the storm left behind

IPDRA working to finish rebuilding what the storm left behind

MAYFLOWER, Ark. (KTHV) – The central Arkansas community still needs the help of lending hands following April’s deadly tornado. One organization is working in coordination with the Vilonia Disaster Recovery Alliance and the Faulkner County Long-Term Recovery Board to get volunteers out to these devastated areas of the state in an effort to help finish rebuilding what the storm left behind.

Inter-Faith and Partners Disaster Recovery Alliance (IPDRA) is made up of several faith-based and voluntary organizations that are working together to secure volunteers, material resources, and funding to meet the needs of others living in Faulkner County and beyond.

Conway to drill under landfill for methane

Conway to drill under landfill for methane


CONWAY, Ark. (KTHV) - Leaders in Conway voted to spend $100,000 to drill under the city's landfill in search of an underground fuel source.

On Monday, the Conway city council voted to drill pilot wells in the landfill to see if enough methane gas is there, and could be used as an alternate fuel source.

They say if there is gas under the landfill and it's of the right quality, the city can use it for their garbage trucks and their new police vehicles.

"So that old thing that no one ever considered an asset on the outskirts of town looks like it has a chance of performing a great service for the city and being a source of alternative renewable energy, which burns cleaner than gasoline," said Tab Townsell, Conway Mayor.

The city's Sanitation Director says it would cost an estimated $1.7 million to collect methane from the landfill, purify and use it as a fuel source.

Conway eyes alternative fuel source for trucks

Conway eyes alternative fuel source for trucks


CONWAY, Ark. (AP) - Leaders in Conway are deciding whether to drill test wells in the city's landfill to see if enough methane exists underground to use as a fuel source.

The Conway City Council is set to vote Tuesday night on whether to spend $100,000 to drill pilot wells in the landfill. If enough methane is present in the landfill, it could be used to fuel the city's garbage trucks or as a heating source.

Conway Sanitation Director Cheryl Harrington tells the Log Cabin Democrat that it'd cost an estimated $1.7 million to collect methane from the landfill, purify and use it as a fuel source. She says her department now spends about $900,000 annually on diesel fuel.

(Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)


AGFC approves grant of fine money to counties

AGFC approves grant of fine money to counties

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (September 18, 2014) – When the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission collects fines from game law convictions, the money goes back to the county where it was collected. During Thursday's monthly Commission meeting, the agency approved a grant of more than $679,100 to the Arkansas Department of Education as a result of fines collected during the 2014 fiscal year.

The money is used to fund educational programs focused on fish, wildlife and conservation in the counties where the offenses occurred. The highest amount of fine money went to Drew County with just over $28,000. The next highest amount went to Arkansas County with more than $25,900 in fines.