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Arkansas Tobacco Free Kids Day

Arkansas Tobacco Free Kids Day

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (Ark. Youth Leadership Initiative) - Kids from across Arkansas will convene in Little Rock to join in the fight against tobacco and other nicotine use on Wednesday, March 18th with a Silent March and Mock Funeral along Capitol Avenue, followed by a press conference on the steps of the State Capitol.

Sponsored by the Arkansas Youth Leadership Initiative and other public health partners, Arkansas Tobacco Free Kids Day is an annual celebration of youth leadership and activism in the fight against tobacco use. Kids are sending two powerful messages on this day: They want the tobacco companies to stop targeting them with marketing for cigarettes, e-cigarettes, and other tobacco products and they want elected leaders to do more to protect them from tobacco.

IPDRA working to finish rebuilding what the storm left behind

IPDRA working to finish rebuilding what the storm left behind

MAYFLOWER, Ark. (KTHV) – The central Arkansas community still needs the help of lending hands following April’s deadly tornado. One organization is working in coordination with the Vilonia Disaster Recovery Alliance and the Faulkner County Long-Term Recovery Board to get volunteers out to these devastated areas of the state in an effort to help finish rebuilding what the storm left behind.

Inter-Faith and Partners Disaster Recovery Alliance (IPDRA) is made up of several faith-based and voluntary organizations that are working together to secure volunteers, material resources, and funding to meet the needs of others living in Faulkner County and beyond.

Conway to drill under landfill for methane

Conway to drill under landfill for methane


CONWAY, Ark. (KTHV) - Leaders in Conway voted to spend $100,000 to drill under the city's landfill in search of an underground fuel source.

On Monday, the Conway city council voted to drill pilot wells in the landfill to see if enough methane gas is there, and could be used as an alternate fuel source.

They say if there is gas under the landfill and it's of the right quality, the city can use it for their garbage trucks and their new police vehicles.

"So that old thing that no one ever considered an asset on the outskirts of town looks like it has a chance of performing a great service for the city and being a source of alternative renewable energy, which burns cleaner than gasoline," said Tab Townsell, Conway Mayor.

The city's Sanitation Director says it would cost an estimated $1.7 million to collect methane from the landfill, purify and use it as a fuel source.

Conway eyes alternative fuel source for trucks

Conway eyes alternative fuel source for trucks


CONWAY, Ark. (AP) - Leaders in Conway are deciding whether to drill test wells in the city's landfill to see if enough methane exists underground to use as a fuel source.

The Conway City Council is set to vote Tuesday night on whether to spend $100,000 to drill pilot wells in the landfill. If enough methane is present in the landfill, it could be used to fuel the city's garbage trucks or as a heating source.

Conway Sanitation Director Cheryl Harrington tells the Log Cabin Democrat that it'd cost an estimated $1.7 million to collect methane from the landfill, purify and use it as a fuel source. She says her department now spends about $900,000 annually on diesel fuel.

(Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)


AGFC approves grant of fine money to counties

AGFC approves grant of fine money to counties

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (September 18, 2014) – When the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission collects fines from game law convictions, the money goes back to the county where it was collected. During Thursday's monthly Commission meeting, the agency approved a grant of more than $679,100 to the Arkansas Department of Education as a result of fines collected during the 2014 fiscal year.

The money is used to fund educational programs focused on fish, wildlife and conservation in the counties where the offenses occurred. The highest amount of fine money went to Drew County with just over $28,000. The next highest amount went to Arkansas County with more than $25,900 in fines.

Ragweed season in full swing

Ragweed season in full swing


LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (KTHV) - Fall allergy season is already in the air. One of the most common allergens in Arkansas right now is ragweed.

"Here in Arkansas it usually begins in the second or third week of August," said Dr. Karl Sitz, Little Rock Allergy and Asthma Clinic. "And will peak in the first or second week of September, and continue until early October."

He said the plant is more recognizable that you may realize.

"It's a bush that you can look at as you're driving down the road and you'll see it growing on the side of the road in ditches," he said.

The classic symptoms include sneezing, stuffiness, watery eyes and a runny nose. But with other fall pollens in the air, it's hard to know for sure if ragweed is the cause of those symptoms.

Hospital reports increase in snake bites

Hospital reports increase in snake bites

LITTLE ROCK, Ark.(KTHV)- Doctors and nurses at Arkansas Children's Hospital are reporting a 50 percent increase in snake bites this summer.

Children's Hospital typically sees 20 to 25 snake bites a year, but already this year they've treated 30 cases. Donna Parnell-Beasley is the trauma coordinator at Arkansas Children's Hospital, and she says they're not really sure about the uptick, but wants parents to be aware.

"Children may have been outside playing more than when it's really, really hot."

Parnell-Beasley says 2014 is shaping up to be the summer of snakes

"The majority of the injuries we've seen this summer have been on feet where children step down next to a snake and a snake bites them."